My Picks for Halloween 2014

Oooooooh. Halloween is right around the corner.  Here are my film picks for a long evening of monster mayhem. Let’s start with an animated short.

skeleton-dance_prancing-skeletonUb Iwerk’s brilliant The Skeleton Dance (1929) is a masterwork of early American animation available on the Walt Disney Treasures Collection, DVD Catalogue #52420 (The Adventures of Oswald The Lucky Rabbit). The short runs approximately 5:30 and is a delight from beginning to end and is perfect for setting the mood for the following films.

Dr. Sadism_Titles

The Torture Chamber of Dr. Sadism (aka Castle of the Walking Dead, 1967) is a quintessential 1960’s Euro-horror film loosely based on Poe’s The Pit and the Pendulum (1983), and reminds me of various Poe-influenced fright films produced under American-International Pictures (House of Usher, 1960; TPATP, 1961 and others). The film stars the inimitable Christopher Lee as a sadistic nobleman who has returned from being drawn and quartered to raise blood-letting hell on those that defy him.  Karin Dor (You Only Live Twice, 1967) provides the eye candy. This film has all the Halloween trappings including colorful photography, a corridor with arachnids and scorpions, a snake pit, skeleton, green blood, ghosts, cobbly passageways, and diabolical torture devices, including one hell of a pendulum.

Dr. Sadism_Pendulum

This is the film where Christopher Lee’s body, under suspended animation, reassembles and connects (*pop*) dismembered limbs! Be sure to watch the widescreen “Johnny Legend Presents” DVD with added bonus feature Death Smiles of a Murderer (1973)(not recommended).

Murders in the Zoo_Titles

For the next film I recommend a lesser known horror film from the golden age of horror.  Paramount’s Murders in the Zoo (1933) is one of the most gruesome pre-code horror-thrillers ever made. Lionell Atwill plays a fiendish psychopathic zoologist and game hunter Eric Gorman, possibly patented after animal collector Frank Buck (1884-1950), who has problems with other men looking at his wife, and knows nefarious ways of dealing with them! Right from the opening this film packs a wallop.

Murders in the Zoo_Mouth SewZoo has a solid cast with Randolph Scott (who starred in three non-western genre films with Zoo, 1933; Supernatural, 1933; and She, 1935), as a herpetologist, Gail Patrick, character actor Charles Ruggles, and Lionell Atwill as the heavy. Here’s another film with odd halloween accoutrements, including venomous snakes, venom injection apparatus, a monster crocodile and other surprises. Unfortunately, Zoo is hard to come by on DVD. It was once available as a TCM Vault Collection “Universal Cult Horror Collection” set of five films.

Murders in the Zoo_R Scott with Rattlesnake

If you can’t find Murders in the Zoo, Universal’s The Old Dark House (1932) is the lesser known and appreciated of James Whale’s horror films, including Frankenstein (1931), The Invisible Man (1933) and The Bride of Frankenstein (1935). I like the film a lot, with major kudos to cinematographer Arthur Edeson (Frankenstein, 1931; The Maltese Falcon, 1941) and a superb script and cast, but I don’t agree with horror film historian and author Bryan Senn, who describes the film as “the one truly flawless picture from the golden age of horror” (Melvyn Douglas’ singing and comedic quips annoy me and there are too many characters in the story). The film is best known today for Karloff’s performance as the ape-like butler Morgan. Check out the KINO special collector’s edition DVD, with running commentary by actress Gloria Stuart.

The Old Dark House_Boris

For the finale I’m picking Richard Gordon’s wildly entertaining horror/sci-fi hybrid Fiend Without a Face (1957). This is the film with the stop-motion animated brain suckers terrorizing an air force base.  Be sure to grab the Criterion 1.66:1 print of this classic of British genre filmmaking.

Fiend without a Face

One Response to “My Picks for Halloween 2014”

  1. Super list, Barry. “Castle Of The Living Dead” with Christopher Lee is simply fantastic, too! I love your picks of “Murders In The Zoo” and “Fiend Without A Face”….I remember watching “Fiend” many times on “Superhost`s Mad Theatre” back in the 1970`s! Those flying invisible brains scared the daylights out of me!

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